First Carrier Countermeasure Anti-Torpedo Launched

First Carrier Countermeasure Anti-Torpedo Launched

USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) conducted the first aircraft carrier-borne end-to-end at-sea test of the Surface Ship Torpedo Defense (SSTD) System, the Navy announced, June 6.

The SSTD System combines the passive detection capability of the Torpedo Warning System that not only finds torpedoes, but also classifies and tracks them, with the hard-kill capability of the Countermeasure Anti-Torpedo, an encapsulated miniature torpedo. The at-sea tests were conducted May 15-19.

The Countermeasure Anti-Torpedo is being developed by the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory (PSU-ARL). It is designed to locate, home in on and destroy hostile torpedoes. Over the four-day testing period, Bush engaged seven torpedo-like targets with seven Countermeasure Anti-Torpedoes. Designed to validate the end-to-end of the system, the testing proved successful.

“These tests are a culmination of a very focused effort by the Navy including the program office, Bush’s crew, Norfolk Naval Shipyard and our academic and industrial partners. With all seven of our shots doing what they are designed and built to do, it validates our work and significantly enhances our current capabilities,” said Capt. Moises DelToro, the Undersea Defensive Warfare Systems program manager.

This first end-to-end test of the SSTD System achieved several firsts: the first Torpedo Warning System detection of targets from a carrier, the first automatic detection and automatic targeting of an incoming torpedo target from a ship, the first launch of Countermeasure Anti-Torpedo from a carrier and the first end to end Torpedo Warning System and Countermeasure Anti-Torpedo system detection-to-engage at-sea test.

“It is gratifying to have these tests go so well,” said Rear Adm. David Johnson, program executive officer, Submarines, whose portfolio includes the Undersea Defensive Warfare Systems Program Office. “The engineering involved to detect a hostile torpedo, process its direction, speed, depth, and then engage it with a carrier-launched Countermeasure Anti-Torpedo is impressive. I am confident that the fleet will be pleased with the results.”

Given the complexity of the system, the program office is taking an incremental approach to the development and acquisition of the Surface Ship Torpedo Defense System.

“What is currently aboard Bush is an engineering development model, or EDM, that is a fully-functioning system, but not the final configuration or production model,” DelToro said. “We’re learning from the Bush to improve the system so we can provide the most robust and cost-effective hard-kill anti-torpedo capability possible.”

The Navy currently plans to equip all aircraft carriers and other high-value units with the Surface Ship Torpedo Defense system by 2035.

Sikorsky to Build CH-53K Operational Test Helicopters for US Navy

Sikorsky to Build CH-53K Operational Test Helicopters for US Navy
Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. has received a $435 million U.S. Navy contract to build four production-representative CH-53K heavy lift helicopters for the U.S. Marine Corps. Designated as System Demonstration Test Articles (SDTA), the four aircraft will enable the Marines to conduct operational evaluation of the new helicopter system in support of Initial Operational Capability in 2019.

“The four SDTA aircraft are based on the configuration of the fourth and final flight test aircraft currently being assembled on the prototype production line,” said Dr. Michael Torok, Sikorsky’s CH-53K Program Vice President. “We truly appreciate the high level of confidence the Navy and Marine Corps have shown to the CH-53K team as we move forward with this important next phase of the program.”

The Navy has included the SDTA helicopters as an additional line item under the existing $3.5 billion System Development and Demonstration (SDD) contract initially awarded to Sikorsky in April 2006. The contract schedule requires that Sikorsky deliver the first SDTA aircraft in 39 months, and the fourth by the end of March 2017, when the Marines will begin operational evaluation. The contract’s cost-plus-incentive fee arrangement incentivizes Sikorsky to deliver early. Sikorsky will perform final assembly of the SDTA aircraft at the company’s Florida Assembly and Flight Operations facility in West Palm Beach.

To date, Sikorsky has delivered two of the seven SDD CH-53K aircraft – the Ground Test Vehicle and the Static Test Article – into the test program, and is finalizing assembly of the four flight test aircraft and the Fatigue Test Article. First flight of a CH-53K prototype aircraft is expected in late 2014.

Once the SDTA aircraft enter operational evaluation in 2017, the Marine Corps will verify the CH-53K helicopter’s capability to carry 27,000 pounds over 110 nautical miles under “high hot” ambient conditions, nearly tripling the external load carrying capacity of the current CH-53E Super Stallion™ helicopter.

Technology enablers for increased lift include three 7,500-shaft-horsepower GE38-1B engines; a split torque transmission design that more efficiently distributes engine power to the main rotors; fourth-generation composite rotor blades for enhanced lift; and a composite airframe structure for reduced weight.

“The SDTA contract represents an exciting and significant milestone in our program,” said Col. Robert Pridgen, the Heavy Lift Helicopters program manager for the Naval Air Systems Command. “We are well on our way to making the CH-53K a reality for our Marines and our Naval fleet. The capability this aircraft brings, in every clime and place, is critical to sustaining the future missions of the Marine Air/Ground Task Force. The future of heavy lift is bright.”

Per the current program of record, the Navy intends to order an additional 196 CH-53K aircraft as part of a separate production contract to stand up eight operational squadrons and one training squadron to support the Marine Corps’ operational requirements. Eventual production quantities would be determined year-by-year over the life of the program based on funding allocations set by Congress and the U.S. Department of Defense acquisition priorities.

Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., based in Stratford, Conn., is a world leader in helicopter design, manufacture, and service. United Technologies Corp., based in Hartford, Conn., provides a broad range of high technology products and support services to the aerospace and building systems industries.

DDG 51 Multiyear Procurement Contract Awarded

ddg51

The Navy awarded two contracts for the DDG 51 fiscal years (FY) 2013-2017 multiyear procurement (MYP) for DDG 51 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers June 3.

General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (BIW) is being awarded a $2,843,385,450 fixed-price incentive firm target (FPIF) contract for the design and construction of four DDG 51 class ships, one in FY 2013 and one each in FY 2015-2017. This award also includes a contract option for a fifth ship.

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) is being awarded a $3,331,476,001 fixed-price-incentive firm target (FPIF) contract for the design and construction of five DDG 51 class ships, one each in FY 2013-2017.

These multiyear procurement awards are for a total of nine ships, with an option for a tenth ship. The Navy’s objective is to procure the tenth ship as part of the planned FY 2013-2017 MYP. The Navy will work with Congress to resolve funding shortfalls resulting from sequestration reductions before contracting for the 10th ship.

“These contract awards represent great value to the taxpayer and will ensure our warfighters have the ships and systems they need to prevail in any situation,” said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. “By leveraging competition in the DDG 51 class shipbuilding program, these shipbuilders will continue their proud histories in delivering these highly capable ships to the fleet while meeting critical operational requirements for integrated air and missile defense capability.”

A competitive allocation strategy used in the DDG 51 class shipbuilding program since 1996, known as profit related to offers, or PRO, uses FPIF contracts to ensure reasonable prices while maintaining the industrial base. Congressional approval for the use of MYP contracts facilitated program budget savings of more than $1.5 billion while enabling the shipbuilders and equipment manufacturers to more efficiently plan future workloads.

“I am proud of the success of the DDG 51 program and appreciate Congress’ continued support and approval of the Navy’s multiyear procurement request,” said Mabus. “This award enables stability in our industrial base and ensures the Navy and the nation get the most efficient and affordable build plan for these destroyers.”

The destroyers are being procured in a Flight IIA configuration, relying on a stable and mature infrastructure while increasing the ship’s air and missile defense capabilities through spiral upgrades to the weapons and sensor suites.

The Navy plans to introduce the first DDG 51 Flight III on the second ship in FY 2016. Once Flight III requirements are approved, the new baseline will be implemented as an engineering change proposal. It is anticipated that the Flight III design will replace the Aegis AN/SPY-1D radar with the Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) and provide for more electrical power and cooling capacity, providing the next generation of integrated air and missile defense and joint battle space awareness.

Russia’s New Nuclear Sub in Sea Trials

yasen

Russia’s Project 885 Yasen-class attack submarine, the Severodvinsk, has embarked on its latest series of official tests in the White Sea, the manufacturer said Monday.

Sevmash shipyard spokeswoman Yekaterina Pilikina said the tests had started several days ago, without providing details on their time frame or scope.

The shipyard had earlier said the submarine would continue tests that had started in 2011. The Severodvinsk has spent a total of 137 days at sea.

The submarine, whose construction began in 1993, is due to be delivered to the Navy later this year. It was to have been handed over by the end of 2012.

The Severodvinsk carried out a series of cruise-missile test-firings in November, including the test-launch of a supersonic cruise missile at a land target.

The multirole attack submarine has a submerged displacement of 13,800 tons, length of 119 meters, speed of 31 knots, and can dive to 600 meters. It has a crew of 90, including 32 officers.

It is armed with 3M55 Oniks (SS-N-26) and 3M54 (SS-N-27) Kalibr cruise missiles, torpedoes and mines.

Russia to Lay Keel for 4th Project 11356 Frigate

yantar shipyard

MOSCOW, April 15 (RIA Novosti) – The Russian Navy’s fourth Project 11356 frigate will have its keel laid on Thursday, the Yantar shipyard said on Monday.

The start of construction work on the Admiral Butakov frigate was postponed in October 2012.

The Kaliningrad-based shipyard is to build a total of six Project 11356 frigates under a contract with the Defense Ministry.

The lead warship in the series, the Admiral Grigorovich, was laid down in December 2010, the second, the Admiral Essen, in July 2011 and the third, the Admiral Makarov, in February 2012.

The shipyard is to hand over the six warships to the Navy between 2014 and 2016.

Project 11356 frigates are designed for anti-ship and anti-submarine warfare on the high seas, and for anti-aircraft operations, both independently and as an escort ship. The vessels are armed with strike anti-ship and surface-to-air missiles, gun mounts, torpedoes and bombs, according to navaltoday.com.

India and France will hold a joint naval exercise

India and France will be holding a joint naval exercise off the Goa coast on April 17, which is mainly aimed at honing the skills of Indian Navy in tackling anti-piracy and anti-submarine operations.

“The 30-hour exercise would begin on April 17 morning”, said Commander Guillaume Fontarensky, commanding the anti-submarine Destroyer ‘FNS Montcalm’, currently docked at Goa’s Mormugao Port Trust (MPT), before initiating exercises with the Indian Navy.

The exercise is the part of a larger naval drill held annually between the French and Indian navies.

“Such kind of smaller exercises are held to increase the understanding between the two navies in between the larger drill”, said Fontarensky.

“The exercise, scheduled off the Goa coast, would hone the skills of Indian Navy in anti-submarine and anti-piracy operations”, the commander said, adding a common procedure would be developed by both the navies to fight against submarines of hostile nations.

He said the details about participation from Indian counterpart would be known only after the session on Monday.

Meanwhile, Francois Richier, French Ambassador in India, told reporters that such an exchange was crucial for ensuring safety of the Indian Ocean.

“The threat can come from anywhere, even from under the sea. This is very important for ensuring safety of the Indian Ocean”, the Ambassador said, adding the threat of piracy in Indian Ocean has diminished to a great extent on the back of crackdown on the sea brigands by various navies.

“The number of attacks by pirates has decreased of late, compared to the past”, Richier said.

Source

India and France will hold a joint naval exercise

India and France will be holding a joint naval exercise off the Goa coast on April 17, which is mainly aimed at honing the skills of Indian Navy in tackling anti-piracy and anti-submarine operations.

“The 30-hour exercise would begin on April 17 morning”, said Commander Guillaume Fontarensky, commanding the anti-submarine Destroyer ‘FNS Montcalm’, currently docked at Goa’s Mormugao Port Trust (MPT), before initiating exercises with the Indian Navy.

The exercise is the part of a larger naval drill held annually between the French and Indian navies.

“Such kind of smaller exercises are held to increase the understanding between the two navies in between the larger drill”, said Fontarensky.

“The exercise, scheduled off the Goa coast, would hone the skills of Indian Navy in anti-submarine and anti-piracy operations”, the commander said, adding a common procedure would be developed by both the navies to fight against submarines of hostile nations.

He said the details about participation from Indian counterpart would be known only after the session on Monday.

Meanwhile, Francois Richier, French Ambassador in India, told reporters that such an exchange was crucial for ensuring safety of the Indian Ocean.

“The threat can come from anywhere, even from under the sea. This is very important for ensuring safety of the Indian Ocean”, the Ambassador said, adding the threat of piracy in Indian Ocean has diminished to a great extent on the back of crackdown on the sea brigands by various navies.

“The number of attacks by pirates has decreased of late, compared to the past”, Richier said.

 
 

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